“LOOK AT THE FIELDS!”

The disciples show up just as Jesus has finished talking to a shady lady at Jacob’s well.  She has gone back to the village with her tale of a man who told her everything she ever did, a man who offered her living water, a man who must indeed be the Messiah, the Christ of God!

Pointing to the fields of grain blowing in the breeze, Jesus reminds the disciples of their own daily small talk about crops and weather – the sort of thing any of us in Bangor might talk about – how many months until harvest – how time flies – how the weather is changing.  

Then, as the Samaritans from the village make their way across the fields to Jacob’s well, Jesus says:  “I tell you, open your eyes and look at the fields!  They are ripe for harvest.”  Open your eyes – look at them – a great harvest of souls ripe for the picking – often one at a time – like this lost Samaritan woman – sometimes in big cities, small towns or third world counties.

Paul once told the Christians at Ephesus:  “I pray that the eyes of your heart may be enlightened” (Ephesians 1:18 EHV).    Every day people troop past us with hidden chains, people who perhaps are not like us, or not to our liking.  But all of these people have souls – destined to spend eternity in God’s presence or forever cut off from Him.  These souls are like you and me – wounded by sin.  They need Christ just as much as we need Him.  

The harvest is great and time is running out.  God will surely gather in His elect –every last one of them.  But it is our own great loss if we want no part of the privilege of gathering in the harvest.

Mission work is not an option.  It is not an extra-curricular activity.  The marching orders of the Christian Church are clear – to make disciples of all nations – to baptize and to teach all things which Christ has commanded, hammering the tent stakes firmly into the ground of Scripture here at home, that we might lengthen the cords of these gospel blessings in places far away.  The Church which takes God at His word on this – which lives not for itself but gives itself away in service to Christ will be blessed.  

We all know what happens to a car if you leave it in the garage and never drive it because you’re afraid you’ll wear it out – or what happens to a house if you let it sit and never live in it because you don’t want to get it dirty.  It goes to ruin.  

The same thing happens to a church which thinks it can guard its existence by selfishness.  Jesus set down the eternal principle in more than one way:  “To him who has, the same will be given more – but to the one who has not, even what he thinks he has will be taken from him.”  Christ loves us.  He loves our neighbor just as much.  “I tell you, open your eyes and look at the fields!”  

Posted in Blog | Tagged , , , , , ,
Rev. Roy W. Hefti

About Rev. Roy W. Hefti

Pastor Hefti grew up on the North side of LaCrosse. He is a 1971 graduate of Luther High School. He then attended Northwestern College in Watertown, WI. After graduation, he went on to attend Wisconsin Lutheran Seminary in Mequon, WI. He graduated the Seminary in 1979 and accepted his first call to start a mission congregation in Mississauga, Ontario, Canada. In May 1984, Pastor Hefti received and accepted the call to be the Pastor of St. Paul’s. Pastor, his wife Alice and 3 children moved to Bangor in July of 1984. The Lord blessed the Heftis with 3 more children while living in Bangor. Their 6 children are now grown and are living around the world. In addition to his pastoral duties, Pastor Hefti teaches 7th-8th grade confirmation classes and also teaches a rotating class of “A Touch of Latin” or “A Touch of German” to familiarize the children with a foreign language. Each morning, Pastor conducts a Bible study with the faculty and he also conducts a weekly mission devotion with the whole school.