'The Book of Concord' Tagged Posts

'The Book of Concord' Tagged Posts

“SHIBBOLETHS”

The 12th chapter of Judges tells us how the men of Ephraim crossed to the east side of Jordan to fight against Jephthah and the men of Gilead.  Jephthah and the Gileadites won. The survivors of Ephraim tried to retreat to their own territory on the west side of the Jordan. But whenever an Ephraimite requested safe passage across the Jordan River, the men of Gilead would ask:  “Are you an Ephraimite?” When the frightened Ephraimite said, “No,” the men…

THE AUGSBURG CONFESSION – JUNE 25, 1530

On this date in history (June 25, 1530), 487 years ago, the Augsburg Confession was presented by our Lutheran forefathers to Emperor Charles V. Dr. Martin Luther, with a price on his head ever since his famous stand before the emperor at Worms in 1521, corresponded with the Lutheran princes and theologians from the Castle Coburg by a sort of pony-express arrangement.  This arrangement was meant to protect the great reformer.  Even Luther’s most powerful friends were not sure they…

WHAT IS A “CONFESSIONAL” LUTHERAN?

The Gospels record how Peter boldly confessed His faith in Jesus as the promised Messiah, the Christ, the Son of the living God.   The word for “confess” in the language of the Bible literally means “to say the same thing.” When we “confess” our sins, we are “saying the same thing” God says about us.   We are agreeing with what God tells us about ourselves.  We are admitting that we are sinners in need of Christ’s forgiveness. When we…

“SHIBBOLETHS”

The 12th chapter of Judges tells us how the men of Ephraim crossed to the east side of Jordan to fight against Jephthah and the men of Gilead.  Jephthah and the Gileadites won.  The survivors of Ephraim tried to retreat to their own territory on the west side of the Jordan. But whenever an Ephraimite requested safe passage across the Jordan River, the men of Gilead would ask:  “Are you an Ephraimite?”  When the frightened Ephraimite said, “No,” the men…

CONFESSING CHRIST

When asked about their religious beliefs, more and more folks these days might say:  “Well, it’s a deeply personal and private matter.”   Who would doubt that one’s religious beliefs are personal.  For good or bad they personally affect us.  But along with that word “personal” comes the word “private.” Imagine talking that way in regard to other subjects.  Your friend asks:   “Hey, what do you think about all that government surveillance stuff?”   You say:  “Well, I can’t talk about it.…